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. officials shut down both directions of u.s. 1 and students at nearby university of maryland have received notice of university of miami -- university of miami and have received notice of the hostage situation. >>> a commuter alert now in virginia. state police are on the scene of a serious multicar crash on eastbound i-66. officials tell 9 news now all lanes of eastbound i-66 have been shut down after a collision involving at least three vehicles prior to the roosevelt bridge. we are just getting in good news from these motorists. it may not look like it on this shot but parts of the lane are open and some traffic is getting through in the area. fire officials say initial 918 calls indicated the motorist that caused the crash may have suffered an emergency. several victims were transported from the scene. again, some of the lanes of eastbound 66 have reopened but traffic will be delayed for a while there. >>> firefighters are keeping an eye on the burning rubble of what used to be two homes in northern virginia. still winds helped to spread the flames among several houses in manassas near
in flames. they'll join us live in a studio for an exclusive interview this thursday morning, september for an exclusive interview this thursday morning, september 16th, 2010 captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning to you. another beautiful day here. hope it is lovely where you are waking up this morning. thanks for being with us. >> good morning, everybody. >> a lot to get to this morning. we'll take a look, too, in the broadcast at pope's visit to the uk, arriving there today, really a controversial visit for a number of reasons but also speaking out more about the alleged sex abuse within the catholic church, really making some of his most pointed comments saying the church failed to act decisively or quickly enough to deal with priests who rape and molest children that, understandably getting attention. >>> one of the other stories we'll talk about this morning, the search for kyron horman, continues in the pacific northwest although the county where the search is centered, they spent more than a million dollars on this search and basically came out yesterday and said, we can't sp
is joining us live from 495. >> reporter: anybody that has ever driven along the 395 corridor during rush hour know how bad it can be. but many drivers fear with the opening of this new mark center, many people fear that rush hour conditions on 395 could get much, much worse. two hours a day worth in fact. and last night, hundreds of fairfax county residents preparedded with the officials at the department of defense to delay the opening till better transportation is in place. they say it will be intolerable conditions for drivers. and now 6400 people are set to start working at the mark center next fall. he was built nowhere near a metro station. it would force and influx much drivers on the i495 corridor, tacking on an average of two hours are to the commute. the department of defense says don't worry, we got a plan. they are going to stagger work hours and encourage workers to carpool. but there are people are saying there's no way that will work. >> this is absurd to our intelligence. i beg you to look at the idea of true mass transportation. >> reporter: that's a terrible thought. an
is back on u.s. soil and begging for the release of her two companions. >>> and bear attack, a washington man is savagely mauled while walking his dogs, as his wife steps in. >> oh, god, his head is all bashed in and he's dying. >> we'll talk with her exclusively about how she helped save his life early this monday exclusively about how she helped save his life early this monday morning, september 20th, 201. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. from new york. good to be back with all of you. i'm maggie rodriguez. good to be back with you, as well, harry. >> good morning. welcome back. >> thank you. >> baby pictures later, right? >> absolutely. >> can't wait for that. i'm harry smith. good morning, everybody. lots of news this morning especially in terms of hurricane igor. during the night bermuda just waking up to the devastation caused by the powerful storm, our dave price is here and he has the latest. dave? >> good morning, harry. here's what we know, slowly weakening continuing to pound bermuda, a huge storm but as it passed over the island it left a trail of destruction in its
some folks who were there and experiencing it. woody baker kohn joining us from the american red cross along with adam broadway who saw the explosion as it happened. good to have you with us. woody, if you could, give us an idea at this point, what are the immediate needs for folks in the area? >> well, those that got out of the area, the fire department and police department were quick in getting people out. we then assessed anybody that had injuries that needed treatment. people that were maybe missing life-sustaining medications, things of that nature. and then we quickly set up a couple of shelters to house people overnight, brought in some mental health professionals as well as some nursing staff to help with the medical needs and so forth. so, we've now got them in shelters. many of them had places to go of their own, friends and family. >> luckily. it's amazing, considering the time of day, just around dinner time, with flames that were hot enough to crack the windshields of a fire truck. amazing there wasn't more damage, that we're not hearing about more injuries and deaths. ad
the child to us yet and neighbors describe an awful scene. right before noon today, a mother outside screaming for help. the first police officers arriving here quickly hustling the child and his father into a police car, racing him away to the hospital near here, but it was too late. >> it was the cords on a set of window shades that apparently strangled the child. inside the ground floor apartment at 901 north hampton, an incident shocked neighbors. >> it's like a chain cord. the baby got tangled inside it. we weren't there. we saw the helicopter, the police took the baby. and the detectives are here. it's crazy. >> police did not wait for an ambulance. an officer immediately got his boy in a washington hospital just 2 1/2 miles away. >> they have three children. three boys and they are all small. they go to elementary school. the one died is a year and a half. >> police investigating the incident believe it was an accident. most apartments in this complex are outfitted with shades that open and close with a wand that's impossible for children to tangle in. but some residents
you with us. you saw some of the pictures from the wildfires. you know the area really well in colorado. we'll bring you the latest. dozens of homes have been burned including four which belong to some of the firefighters who are fighting the blaze. >> planimagine that. s also you've heard about the controversy near ground zero. and there have been all kinds of people protesting this and one of them is a preacher from down in florida who has been on the march on this. and he has promised to burn a koran on the anniversary on the 9/11 anniversary, and it's gotten an interesting response from commander of our troops in iraq who says this is really a bad idea. we'll have more on that in the news block. >>> we want to get this, first, breaking news this morning, the out of control wildfire which has burned dozens of homes. tropical storm hermine meantime is bashing south texas after coming ashore. we'll go to south texas and hear from don teague, but we want to begin with reporter rick sallinger who joins us from are boulder with the latest. >> reporter: good morning. high winds
was found in a piece of luggage, cbs news correspondent bob orr joins us this morning with the latest. bob, good morning. >> good morning, erica. we can say the holiday weekend is off to a tense started with the latest airport scare in miami. authorities tell us everything is getting back to normal. but for seven hours overnight, four of miami's six terminals were shut down. airport roads in the vicinity were closed, passengers were all ordered evacuated and bomb squad technicians moved in. it started around 9:00 with a security officer spotted something in a checked bag, the luggage screening area, where all the bags are put through explosive detection machines. police went out and located the owner of the bag and took that passenger into custody. now we're told the person is expected to be released and may have been released already. while officials will not say exactly on the record what was found, we're led to believe it was not dangerous. for you, the good news is that this evacuation happened during nonpeak hours overnight. not that many flights were effected. there could be residual
this morning, thank you. joining us now is labor of secretary hilda solis. madame secretary, good morning. >> good morning. happy labor day. >> indeed. although a lot of people wish there were more jobs out there. unemployment numbers stuck in the nines, tens of millions of people who have stopped looking for work. any good news on the job front this morning? >> look back eight months and we have actually added about 90,000 private sector jobs each month. when the president took office, remember, we were losing well over 700,000 and 600,000 jobs. i would tell you the course and path we're taking is on target. the president today will talk about infrastructure projects that put construction workers, electricians, welders back to work, and engineers, folks that have been unemployed for a long time. that's something that we -- i believe will get bipartisan support on. >> but the problem is, with some of the growth we have seen, has not been in manufacturing jobs but has been in service sector jobs. the people who need the work the most are the people who have the least amount of education. w
, and in the locker room, as the team and the league open an investigation. she shares her story with us in the studio "early" this tuesday she shares her story with us in the studio "early" this tuesday morning, september 14th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. great to have you with us here on "the early show." >> it's tuesday. beautiful day outside. i'm harry smith. a lot of people looking at what's going on out in the atlantic. already established igor is a category 4. julia is now a hurricane, as well. they're making their way westward through the atlantic. we'll keep an eye on where they're heading. igor, unfortunately, has got a real bead on bermuda. and our dave price, dr. science himself, will be along in a few minutes to explain exactly where those storms are headed. >> dr. science or dr. weather. a little bit of both. first we turn to politics this morning. the tea party and voter anger. there are more primary lessons today around the country and tea party candidates are hoping to upset more established republicans. cbs news correspondental corresponde
, everybody. >> good to have you with us this morning. more fallout from the jets locker room incident over the weekend, players speaking out, clinton portis saying you come to the locker room, basically should expect to be ogled a bit, spoken to hmm. >> lots of debate at lots of dinner tables. also conversation this morning about a couple of new remedies for people with love handles. you would believe you can freeze them off? >> i will try anything. >> we'll talk about that this morning, as well. we begin, though, this morning with politics as the tea party express bowls over more well-known republican candidates in tuesday's primary election. the biggest surprise, the senate primary in delaware. our congressional correspondent nancy cord des is in washington with the latest. nancy, good morning. >> good morning. the most stunning victory yet for the tea party and crushing blow to the republican party leaders who thought vice president biden's former senate seat would be an easy pick-up for them in the fall. not anymore. >> ladies and gentlemen, the people of delaware have spoken. >> repor
in washington, d.c. alongside the likes of mitt romney and mike huckabee. >> the small elite don't get us. they call us whacky. they call us wing nuts. we call us "we the people." (cheers and applause) >> reporter: delaware's new republican senate nominee was at home in this crowd of social conservatives. but even as she preached a return to fiscal conservatism, o'donnell's own unorthodox spending habits were starting to come under heavy scrutiny. staffers on her previous campaign for senate and o'donnell's own financial filings reveal that the unemployed o'donnell used campaign funds to pay for meals, gas, bowling trips, and personal rent, even long after the campaign had ended. >> i've never seen a candidate who just stole all their campaign money and used it for personal use. what it seems like here is christine o'donnell had no other way to support herself so she thought, okay, i'll run for u.s. senate. >> reporter: the nonpartisan watchdog group citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington is urging the u.s. attorney in delaware to open a criminal investigation. >> it's not s
're the belongings of a woman who was evicted from her apartment. 9news reporter kristin fisher joins us now with her story. good morning, kristin. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. so often we hear these stories of eviction and foreclosure taking place across the country but it's very rare to actually see somebody's personal struggle literally spread out on the sidewalk for all to see and that's unfortunately what has happened this morning. take a look. these are all of louisa diaz's belongings. she's 50 years old from venezuela and her stuff is literalliy packed up four or five feet high fun walked with me over here take a look at this. it's not just one street, or one side of the street where this stuff is. it's spread out all the way down the street. look way down there. it spreads out for three more blocks this way and it's all being guarded by a d.c. police officer and the reason he's here is because we're awaiting some trucks to come and take all of her stuff away. louisa has been in the united states for 22 years. she's been in her home, which is just in that block right there. she'
that congressman boehner's comments suggest a willingness to agree to the president's position. we all use the middle class as a political football but extends the tax cuts for the middle class fairly quickly to give them certainty and make sure they know they will get help in tough economic times. >> you know there are plenty of people out there, including peter orszag, who until recently, your director of office of management and budget saying there should be tax increases for nobody. now is not the time to be increasing taxes. >> well, harry, i understand what peter argues, he argues we should extend the middle-class tax cuts for two years and have them expire. he believes if the price of doing that is having to extend the upper-end tax cuts that's what we should do. that's not the president's position because, let's be clear, harry, the tax cuts for the upper end, the wealthy, mostly millionaires, that's a $700 billion proposition the next ten years. the president does not believe that we should be borrowing $700 billion, most likely from overseas, to extend tax cuts follow folks, quit
of a possible o copycat attack. she's with us in the studio early this friday morning, she's with us in the studio early this friday morning, september 17th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good friday morning to you. still waking up there, i'm erica hill. good to have you with us. fog not guilty new york city. >> and right there, too. i'm harry smith. good morning, everybody. breaking news this morning, you'll never guess who showed up in a prison in peru. it was beth hole way trying to vis visit joran van der sleuth, face to face for about five minutes. >> of course natalie hole way's mom who disappeared in rememberu. >>> also people in new york talking about this not only people in new york affected but really unusual in the city yesterday. huge storms rolled through around rush hour. hail, powerful winds, there was a huge thunderstorm. sideways rains and a possible tornado. dave price joins us this morning in queens in forest hills, new york where the storm hit hardest with the latest this morning. talk about destruction, dave. >> you know, typically when weather like this hap
of this country. you know, they say time heals all wounds and i kind of say this every use. i don't know if it applies in this case looking at live pictures now of ground zero. still very raw. >> nine years later. >> hard to believe it has been nine years. coming up on this broadcast not only will we visit on the remembrance ceremony that takes place a bit later in the morning but also have an exclusive look at progress being made at ground soshgs the buildings are now starting to really kind of jump up off street level right now. >> something a lot of people wanted to see. >> you can see tangible progress finally. first normally a dave reflection and remembrance this year the anniversary marked also by controversy, the evangelical pastor who threatened to burn the koran as an actist protest against muslims is in new york this morning and we begin our coverage at ground zero this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. after a series of confusing and conflicting statements in florida, pastor terry jones told reporters last night he is always talked out. his presence here in new
. >> reporter: well, witnesses tell us a young mother and two of her children are dead this morning after a terrifying and desperate scene here at this terrace town home this morning. it started around 8:30. the fire was raging. neighbors heard screaming. they heard what sounded like explosions. they saw a man who looked to be in shock kind of writhing on the ground. that was probably the children's uncle who caught the baby as the mother threw that baby, a baby under one year old, threw the child out the window. the uncle catches the baby. the mother goes and tells two other children ages 6 and 8 to jump out a second floor window. they jump. they're okay. they go to a neighbor's house. and they all hope that the mother's going to come out. and the two other children come out but that doesn't happen. the fire is too strong and the mother and two children do not make it out. the mother cannot save herself or her two other children. [ indiscernible ] >> anything. >> watch and wait for everybody to come. that was the hard part. and i knew that the kids were still in there. i knew the kids we
on whether to allow a company to sell genetically engineered salmon to u.s. consumers. if approved by the fda this would be the first ever genetically engineered animal allowed for human consumption. manuel gullegos joins us live with the implications. a big decision here. >> reporter: that's right. what the federal government is considering is whether genetically engineered salmon that grows twice as fast as wild salmon should be allowed to go to the public. this is salmon grown and harvested in captivity and many consumers feel it's not a good idea because they are scared of it. it is not just a fish story. you could soon be eating genetically engineered salmon. using growth hormone from chan oak salmon, it is claimed that these eggs can grow full market size fish in half the time as wild salmon. they say it is safe and will create jobs. >> we can bring an industry back to the united states and provide americans a safe and sustainable high-quality seafood. >> reporter: the food and drug administration agrees it is safe but is waiting for an advisory panel opinion before approving it for sal
phillips for us in london, thank you for that update. we appreciate it. >>> now to the floods in the upper midwest. residents in parts of minnesota and wisconsin trying to dry out this morning but the flooding may not be over yet. heather brown of our minneapolis station wcco is live from owatonna, minnesota with the latest. good morning. >> good morning. the rivers have started to go down here but the water is still here. scenes like this gas station are common across southern minnesota, the water stuck in these areas. at this point, we don't know how much all of this will cost but the governor has said he will ask for a special legislative session to figure out how to pay for it, all of this because of record rainfall in just a single day. streets turned into rivers, back yards into lakes. across the upper midwest schools flooded and bridges washed away as heavy rain led to rivers overflowing their banks. as much as 10 inches fell in 24 hours in areas of wisconsin and minnesota. the rain let up friday and some rivers are receding but many forced out of their homes can't return. power sta
of her college roommate. now a former fbi agent tells us she's innocent and why the case against her was bungled from the beginning. >>> and kicking the habit. this chain-smoking 2-year-old shocked the world. now he's getting help and we have an exclusive look at his trip to smoking rehab "early" this thursday morning, september trip to smoking rehab "early" this thursday morning, september 2, 20 10. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. i'm erica hill. good to have you with us this morning. >> a steamy morning in new york city. i'm harry smith. good morning. >> we'll get more on this hostage situation at discovery headquarters. starts around 1:00, with a gun. fast forward, three hostages. he is killed. in bullets, but yet the all-clear isn't given until much later afterwards. we'll speak with the police chief this morning and find out where this hands and find out how the hostages are doing as well. >>> we'll start with the latest on hurricane earl, now packing 145-mile-an-hour wind. where it's going, what it's going to do, we'll get it right now from our dave price in kill dev
on bermuda. igor isn't expected to o threaten the u.s., but will cause heavy surf and dangerous rip currents along the eastern seaboard. for a time yesterday, there were actually three hurricanes in the atlantic at the same time that was the first time that's happened in about 12 years. fortunately, none of those hurricanes is currently directly threatening the u.s. betty? >> that's good news. all right, don teague from dallas, thank you so much for that. now to lonnie quinn, tracking the storm. good morning, lonnie. >> i want to give everybody a current p oture of the atlantic basin right now. you heard from don. here's what karl is doing as we speak. yesterday the day of karl, a horrible storm for mexico pushing onshore as a category 2 but dispainted, so no longer a hurricane or o tropical storm now dealing with a remnant low. this weekend igor will push towards bermuda, a category 2 moving to the northwest at 13 with maximum winds of 110 miles per hour and right behind it julia, a tropical storm but will be a storm just for the fish. we have for focus on i goir, a projected path hasn't ch
that is important. we try and add a little more. >> got it. >>> up next hear from a woman who uses psychedelic mushrooms as medicine. that's no the kind of veggies we are talking about. >> i saw it as aioliing, breathing entity. >> in three minutes you will also hear from a johns hopkins phd on the benefits of this control technique. it is our focus on maryland's weather and traffic starting with devon lucie. >> no aberrations in the forecast. another beautiful day coming our way. we will take you in to maryland where you are in the a 0s. rising quickly toe the 60s. annapolis you are a little warmer hugging the bay and same with easton and salisbury. in the 70s by this afternoon. i'm saying node upper 70s. that's where we should cap things off. not the 88 we had at reagan national. hager towns way, 73, 74 for a high. in western maryland you will be hard to break out hoff the mid to upper 60s for highs way out there. the latest in silver spring as we focus on maryland's roads heading eastbound at university and dennis avenue. some police activity going on. losing the right lane. stay left to ge
us here in new york city. good morning, everyone. i'm maggie rodriguez. >> and we got soaked around here yesterday. good morning, everyone, i'm harry smith. of course in the midwest there's still a lot of cleanup and a lot of water piled up all over the place there. and the big story, then, turns out to be in southern california. california, a record-breaking heat wave making l.a. feel more like death valley. in downtown los angeles yesterday, thermometers topped out at 113 degrees, an all-time high. more than 30,000 customers lost power. and the l.a. department of water and power says it recorded its highest-ever demand for electricity. "early" show national correspondent hattie kauffman reports. >> reporter: talk about scorching. los angeles topped out at 113 degrees, the hottest day in l.a. history. it edged out the previous record set in 1990 by one degree. >> i'm going to melt. >> quite frankly, you can feel your skin searing in the heat of it. >> reporter: normally cool air blows in offshore but a high pressure system trapped the heat, which is not good news for firefighters b
residents recommended the ban after the county received an increase in requests to use the space. the county board established a policy that allows up to ten groups at a time to install displays on the courthouse grounds but now that same commission that started it all is now asking the board to reconsider. andrea? >> before you go, as you said we have been talking about this almost a year now. what can we expect at ted's meeting? >> well, today we are expecting the big vote. this is what we have been waiting on for several months now. the county board, the loudoun county board will be voting today. right here in this building at t 30. last night, of course, they listened to the temperature from residents at the public hearing but today is the big day that we should be getting a vote. back to you. >> finally a vote that is an answer. >> i know. >> all right. thank you. >>> new this morning, police investigate a bomb threat on an international flight. while you slept, the fbi scoured its high airways flight. the threat was found scrolled on a bathroom mirror. they searched the plane and spoke
. reporting live, peggy fox, 9news now. >> thanks for taking us to all those locations, peggy. elsewhere in virginia, a driver tried to make it through high water ended up in need of a big rescue, that despite of a big sign. rescuers rescued two people. police believe the driver simply disregarded the warning. >>> and here's another reason not to do that. this car got stuck in some high water this morning in vienna. the water came up 2 feet near the intersection of old courthouse road. the water receded after workers cleared out the storm drain. top. >> you know, southern maryland was a bulls eye for this morning's heavy rain and could be the bulls eye again tonight. many people who live along the chesapeake bay had to pile sandbags along their front doors. and in lusbee, the weather cracked one home's foundation. scott. >> topper, chesapeake ranch estates is where i am. officially down in solomon's, 7.3 inches of rain. a phenomenal amount of rain. it created mud slide conditions in front of this house. pushing water and mud completely through the foundation. >> a house completely und
report declares the recession officially over. but many of us are not feeling it. even taking on the president himself. >> i'm one of your middle-class americans, and quite frankly, i'm exhausted. i'm exhausted of defending you, defending your administration. >> we'll talk live with one of president obama's closest economic advisers. >>> and fighting convention. they've taken over our homes and hotels. fears in stores. bed bugs are big business. we're live at the first-ever bed bug summit early this tuesday we're live at the first-ever bed bug summit early this tuesday morning, september 21st, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> another gorgeous morning here in the city, as it is almost fall. good morning, everybody, i'm harry smith. >> and i'm maggie rodriguez. unfortunately we begin this morning with some breaking news. the sad story out of afghanistan where it's been another deadly morning for nato troops, specifically our troops. nine coalition forces, all of them americans, died in a helicopter crash in the southern part of the country. cbs news correspondent mandy clark i
sergeant. in 1968 he died saving the lives of three wounded comrades when soldiers overran a top-secret u.s. radar station in laos. >>> on the morning news an 11-year-old babysitter charged with murder. >>> plus city officials are arrested in a salary scandal in bell, california. first a preview of the cbs evening news tonight. >>> as questions about the quality of what we eat continue, we'll look at a food safety system full of gaps and redund sees, why haven't the problems that led to the salmonella outbreak been fixed? we'll investigate tonight, only on the cbs evening news. [ female announcer ] stay once... stay twice... earn a free night! two separate stays at comfort inn or any of these choice hotels can earn you a free night -- only when you book at choicehotels.com. i love my grandma. i love you grandma. grandma just makes me happy. ♪ to know, know, know you grandma is the bestest. the total package. grandpa's cooooooooool. way cool. ♪ grandpa spoils me rotten. ♪ to know, know, know you ♪ is to love... some people call us frick and frack. we do finger painting. this is how g
, ripping bricks from buildings, and knocking out power to tens of thousands. >> my used-to-be car is now a convertible. i've seen bad winds. this, they said there was a tornado warning. i think it hit. >> i've been here like over 20 years and i have never seen anything like this. >> a woman died outside manhattan after a tree fell on the car she was sitting in. numerous other injuries were reported. >> we'll get power back. the trees will regrow, but to lose a life -- >> the storm hit at rush hour. rail service between manhattan and long island was suspended. leaving countless commuters in the lurch. >> you just swallow and deal with it, i guess. that's all he can do. you just have to deal with it. >> can't get subway. car services aren't available until after 10:00. so, kind of stranded for a while. >> while it's common for new york city to get a couple tornado warnings a year, only eight have actually hit the city since 1950. there were, also, powerful and damaging storms in central ohio. the strong winds and heavy rain hit thursday night there. are unconfirmed reports of several torna
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28